Thursday, 16 February 2017

"I will never forget them in my life" Miami doctors save 29-year-old Nigerian woman from leg amputation

Doctor at West Kendall Baptist Hospital in South Florida, Miami, USA, have saved a 29-year-old Nigerian woman from losing one of her legs.

 
Nidi Ojobo got a standing ovation from the medical team on Wednesday afternoon, January 15th. She is now walking on her own after an injury in Nigeria that had doctors recommending amputation.
Before she came to Miami in 2015, she had already undergone multiple surgeries in multiple continents, with each other doctor telling her amputation was the best option for leading a normal life. However, Ojobo wouldn’t accept that.
“Everywhere I was going to, they were telling me they had to amputate the leg,” she said.
Surrounded by her doctor and physical therapist, Ojobo was overcome with emotion knowing the months of hard work paid off.
“When patients are motivated and work hard, they can overcome any odds,” said orthopedic surgeon Dr. Charles Jordan.
But to get to this moment — it wasn’t easy for Ojobo.
“She had a metal frame around her leg, she barely walked with crutches,” said her physical therapist Janet Acosta. “She went from almost crying every session that she would come in, not wanting me to touch her leg, to slowly walking.”
Thanks to her determination, Ojobo was able to walk again without amputating her leg.
Dr. Jordan performed three surgeries over the course of a little less than two years. He also admits he had some tough conversations with Ojobo about her progress and treatment
“We actually had a long talk,” Jordan said. “Multiple times, she came into my office. Two or three times, and we spent at least an hour each time just talking about how hard it would be to even attempt to do this without knowing if it was going to work.”

Despite having all the odds against her, the team at the hospital didn’t give up — and neither did she.
“Things like this, events like this are just a testament to the team we have here, how hard everyone works, to make people get better,” Jordan said. 
“I am very happy with her progress,” Acosta said. “I’m proud that we were able to help her, and she’s going to be able to lead a normal life.”

Ojobo said she is thankful for what the doctors did for her.
 “I just want to say how grateful I am,” she said. “I will never forget them in my life. I don’t know how to pay them back.”
Ojobo said she will head back to Nigeria, where she’s aspiring to become a hair dresser.





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