Monday, 17 April 2017

At Least 80 Syrian Children Die As Man Lures Them Towards Car With Exposives To Receive Snacks


A suicide bomber who killed more than 120 people in Syria lured children toward him by handing out crisps before detonating his explosives.

The bomb, which killed at least 120 people including 68 children, tore through buses carrying evacuees from besieged government-held towns, the worst in war-torn Syria in more than a year.

The blast hit a convoy carrying residents from the northern towns of Fuaa and Kafraya as they waited at a transit point in rebel-held Rashidin, west of Aleppo. A suicide bomber who killed more than 120
people in Syria lured children toward him by handing out crisps before detonating his explosives.

The bomb, which killed at least 120 people including 68 children, tore through buses carrying evacuees from besieged government-held towns, the worst in war-torn Syria in more than a year.

A vehicle carrying food had arrived at the transit point and started distributing crisps and attracting children before exploding.

It is unclear how the vehicle gained access to the restricted area without government permission.

A witness said,  'A van was distributing crisps. Children started running after it. It then exploded.'

A girl who was wounded in the blast and lost four siblings in the explosion, said that a man in a car had approached the children and told them to eat the crisps.

She said that many of the children had been deprived of food for years.

The girl told a regional TV station that that once many children had gathered, the man set off the bomb.

At least 109 of the dead were evacuees, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said, while the rest were aid workers and rebels guarding the convoy.

More than 5,000 people left Fuaa and Kafraya and about 2,200 left Madaya and Zabadani on Friday, the latest in a series of evacuations from the four towns under the agreement.

The evacuation process resumed after the bombing, the Observatory said, with the residents of Fuaa and Kafraya eventually arriving in Aleppo, Syria's second city which the government gained full control of last year.

Wounded survivors, including many children, were taken for treatment at an Aleppo hospital.

UN aid chief Stephen O'Brien condemned the bombing, saying in a statement: 'The perpetrators of such a monstrous and cowardly attack displayed a shameless disregard for human life.'







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